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Budget and Negotiations #2 | Class Size
Posted 2/14/20

 

As part of our ongoing conversations about Budget and Negotiations, we want you to understand the truth about the District’s current proposal for class sizes in 2020-2021. It is important for you to know that the district has not proposed increasing class sizes.

  • Currently, the District staffs elementary school classrooms using sitewide averages, and  does not have contractual class size caps. 

  • While we differ with SRVEA on the number of students at which a class should be capped, the District has shifted its longstanding position this year and conceded to a class size cap. 

  • In TK-3, shall be staffed at an average enrollment of 24:1 with a maximum of 26 students per class. Under certain circumstances, this cap could be exceeded by no more than one student and the teacher would be compensated. 

  • In Grades 4-5 the district is proposing a cap of 32 per class. Under certain circumstances, this cap could be exceeded by no more than one student and the teacher would be compensated.

  • The current proposal ensures that no teacher will exceed the contractual caps without compensation. Because the current averages create imbalances which sometimes go over those caps, SRVEA has requested a class size cap.  

 

The class size discussion is complex and has several different components. For those who are interested in more detail, we urge you to please visit the Negotiations page of our website where you can find a thorough explanation of class size, staffing and the impact of class size reduction on our District.

 

We all want our class sizes to be as small as they can be. In an ideal world we would have class sizes down to, if not below, the national average.  Our reality is that since the State of California no longer funds class size reduction, we have had to adjust according to the resources we have available, which is a difficult task given we are the second lowest funded unified school district in the State of California. To date, thanks to sound fiscal management in the past, class sizes in the San Ramon Valley remain very much in line with the state average.